Terance Gough

1st Year Plumber Apprentice

Oct 9, 2020

Terance Gough

Terance Gough is a Metis originally from Eastern Woodland Metis Nation, in Nova Scotia. He has spent the last 20 years of this life in Calgary, Alberta.

He found out about Trade Winds to Success (TWTS) while he was in Drumheller, in a federal penitentiary in 2019. TWTS came and presented to them about this pre-apprenticeship trades training program for indigenous people. After thinking about it, he called the number from the pamphlet for more information while still in Drumheller. He called again just prior to the start date and with a little bit of luck, he got in quite quickly and started his life changing journey. Some of the main reasons he joined the program was because he always wanted to get into a trade. But more because he wanted to pursue a new lifestyle…become a better man and change the direction of his current lifestyle.

For Terance, the program started February 18, 2020 and with a 6 month break in between due to the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. He came back and completed his shop training at the Pipefitters/Plumbers – PITS at the Local 496 union training centre on Oct 9, 2020.

The plan was for him was to continue for the next 3 weeks in academic preparation to prepare for him to write the AIT Entrance Exam – Level 4, like everyone else in his class. As it turned out, an opportunity arose with the union and he was exempt from writing the AIT Entrance Exam, as he had his grade 12 and he immediately started working at SE Johnson. He will be a 1st year apprentice plumber after his 3 months probation period.

Prior to this experience at TWTS, his past employment was a family run business, as a window installer at Window and Door Guys making $20/hr. No real future with these guys but now he had something to work towards. Terance had no expectations from his TWTS experience, he just came to learn. The program gave him another chance in life and some hope. It allowed him to get back on track. He said the training was very useful and efficient, he learned a lot. It was intense at times, but a lot of material covered in such a short time. He would absolutely 100% do it all over again.

His family and friends are impressed and pleased with this part of Terance’s journey. They support his life choices now and want to see him succeed. He is now overcoming his past, getting past the stigma that society has put on ex-convicts.

The most rewarding part of this experience were the staff and how they accommodated everyone to succeed. All the suggestions made to them and the experiences of past students, the general overall experience was something he will never forget. As Terance puts it, no matter what life throws at your or how unfair you think life is, never give up!